July 5, 2016 0 Comments Build Your Empire

What to do when want to do everything

FullSizeRender

 

When I first started out in my business, I massively fell into the shiny lights syndrome.
I was distracted by EVERYTHING
I wanted to run social media campaigns, I wanted to create courses, I wanted to start coaching, I wanted to start a podcast, I wanted to run events, I wanted to write books I wanted to guest speak at events, I wanted to sell products, I wanted to guest blog for influential sites.
Sounds frickin’ exhausting right?
I wanted to do any opportunity that came my way to the point where I took so much on at once I felt massively overwhelmed and like I was actually achieving nothing.
As entrepreneurs and creatives, we are ideas people. We like coming up with our next idea.
After reading The One Thing by Gary Keller, however I’ve become far more focused on doing one thing, doing it well then setting myself up for the next.
Here are some tips for helping you get to grips with your One Thing.

 

  1. Ask yourself “What’s the ONE Thing I could do, such that by doing it everything else would be easier or unnecessary?

     

If you can do one thing that would make life a lot easier, you should focus on that first.
So for example; it could be spending time to set up systems so that everything in your work is automated and runs smoother.
It could be spending time on a project that means a lot of work right now, but that would make things easier later down the line – something like creating an online program is a good example of this.
Think about what is going to have the most impact and provide the most benefits at that point in time.
It doesn’t mean I’m doing less at any one time. I still have a full plate and juggle a hell of a lot of stuff. It just means I have One Thing that will always take priority over other things that are going on – my one area of focus.
  1.  Don’t start everything at the same time.

 

 

Doing The One Thing doesn’t mean you only have to do One Thing for the entirety of your business. It simply means starting One Thing at a time, picking up momentum on it before moving onto the next.
If we start everything all at once, that can be hugely overwhelming.
My advice would be to start with one thing, get to a point where you’ve got into a rhythm with it and have systems in place for it and then, if you feel you’ve the capacity to take on something else without the first task losing momentum, add another thing to your agenda.

 

 

  1.  Create a yearly schedule for when you start your next thing

 

I like to set a yearly agenda of all the big things I’d like to focus on throughout the year, each allocated to certain months.
For example, I had two months of they year where I focused on getting published on other sites/magazines and I dedicated this period to mostly writing content.
Another period of the year is dedicated to content creation for The Clique Academy.
During these periods, it isn’t to say I say NO to everything else – its just that One Thing is a priority and if doing that something else will interfere with that One Thing, then I say no.

 

  1. Cut out the things you don’t want to do

 

 

A good idea when you’ve lots you want to do is to cut out the things you don’t enjoy doing.

 

This is either the things you do because you feel you have to do because everyone else seems to be doing them, or the things you do because they are crucial yet you don’t enjoy.
Just because certain things could have a benefit to your business doesn’t necessarily mean you should be doing them.
Starting a podcast may help you build your audience, as may writing a book, but if these are things you won’t necessarily enjoy, it may turn out to be something that takes you far longer than it needs and will be something you keep pushing under the carpet and never get finished anyway.
Its best to really give priority to things that will be not only beneficial for your business but you will actually want to do.
Also, if there are certain things you know you NEED to do but really hate (hello tax returns!) it can be far more efficient (in both time and money) to delegate/outsource these tasks to someone else.
If you are caught up doing tasks you don’t want to do, you are essentially depriving yourself from tasks that you would enjoy and that could eventually bring you more money later down the line. Sometimes you need to be willing to spend money on help in order to profit in other areas in the future.
  1. Learn to say No.

 

You don’t have to jump on every opportunity that comes your way.
Some things will be so amazing you just can’t pass them up. You need to ask yourself whether this is the case.
Think about what you are getting involved in – is it a once in a lifetime opportunity? Will there be more opportunities like it? Is this the best use of your time right now?
If not, then it may be best to say no for now. Trust your gut on this.

 

 

  1.  Don’t be afraid to take a step back

 

 

Sometimes, you may need to take a step back in order to move forward.
This is particularly true when it comes to scaling up your business. If you are looking to make changes to your business, it may mean cutting back some of the work (and therefore some of the profits) your business is doing now in order to progress.
For example – If you want to start developing online courses, this would be difficuolt if you have a full schedule full of 1:1 clients. You may need to take a step back by cutting down some of your 1:1 clients in order to move forward.

 

 

  1.  Time block – You don’t always have to be “on”

 

 

Sticking with your One Thing is all about focus. Its about getting in the zone on that particular project and seeing it through until the end.

Being constantly “on” however for the entire day can be hugely exhausting.

We may be able to do it for a few days, but by the end of the week, chanced are we will be frazzled. If our One Thing is going to take months of work, being “on” for the entirety of that time may be impossible.

My suggestion is to time block your day so you have certain periods dedicated to your One Thing and save your “on” moments for then. When you are working on your One Thing, eliminate all other distractions, lock yourself away and hone in your focus as much as possible.

For everything else, you don’t need to be so intense.

 

How do you cope with Shiny Lights Sydrome? Do you want to do anything and everything? Let me know in the comments below!

 

 


Share: